Quiche Lorraine

Quiche Lorraine, a traditional French dish, was actually created by the Germans. In medieval times, there was a kingdom called Lothrigen that was controlled by Germany. It was later conquered by the French and renamed Lorraine. During the time the Germans ruled, the quiche (which comes from the German word, “Kuchen” or “cake”) was created. The dish used egg, cream custard, and smoked bacon in a crust made of bread dough. Much later, cheese was added to the dish and the crust was changed to a puff pastry crust.

Quiche Lorraine was the original quiche. However, quiches are now popular all over the world and use a variety of ingredients, from ham and broccoli to salmon and onions.

Servings: 8

Ingredients:

Pastry Dough, 1 Layer

1 teaspoon butter

1 cup smoked speck bacon, cut into small cubes

1.5 cups Gruyere cheese plus more for sprinkling, grated

4 eggs

1/2 cup full cream

1/2 cup milk

Salt and pepper

1/4 teaspoon Nutmeg

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit.

Along with the butter, slightly brown the bacon until it begins to crisp. Drain on paper towel.

Fit the pastry dough into a deep-dish pie pan. Place the grated Gruyere cheese on the bottom of the puff pastry dough, then add the smoked speck bacon.

Beat together the eggs, then whisk in the cream, milk, salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Pour the egg mixture over the cheese and bacon.

Bake the quiche for 35-40 minutes, until the eggs are set in the middle. In the last 10 minutes, sprinkle with additional cheese, if desired. Cool slightly before removing from the pie pan, and serve.

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